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Language Learning Trends

Here are two predictions:

1. The number of languages spoken by Canadians will increase as immigration trends continue to rise.2. English and French will continue to dominate as the primary languages in Canada, but in certain sections of the country, Asian and Arabic languages will become prominent as population density from immigration rises.

Language Learning Trends in 2016 and beyond

out site English will become one of the top five non-native languages being learned by new Canadians in 2020.  Chinese/Mandarin will join Arabic, Urdu, Farsi, and Spanish  as one of the five most popular non-native languages for Canadians to learn and there will be a double-digit increase in K-12 classrooms using language learning technology.   A confirmation for this trend comes from Rosetta Stone rival Duolingo.

Rosetta Stone also predicts that this year people will use more mobile devices than desktops or laptops to learn a language, which is a trend we can already see in Asia and among learners who use competing services like Adapt2me.

Which Languages will be left in 2115

What will the global language space look like 100 years from now?

Dr. McWhorter, who teaches linguistics, American Studies, philosophy and music at Columbia University, wrote a commendable essay last week.

readme He predicts that in 2115 the landscape will have radically changed but that English will remain lingua franca. From the 6000 languages that are currently spoken only, 600 will survive. A lot of those remaining languages will be dialects of more widely spoken languages like English.

The remaining languages will also be simplified with less complicated grammar and less vocabulary.  The latter will be driven by third wave of language “streamlining” that takes place among immigrant communities in cities around the globe.

Today language learning technology is once again on the upswing, powered by mobile devices as well as better broadband and mobile coverage. This leads to the following five key trends in language learning we see for the coming years.

Mobile

Mobile is the rocket fuel for the new wave of language learning products. Smartphones and mobile Internet made it possible to add bite-sized lessons and learning sprints to the daily routine of commuters. From serious approaches based on curated web content, mobile is THE learning environment to conquer in the language space.

Personalised and Adaptive

One-size-fits-all educational content for language learning will become a thing of the past. Learners today want content tailored to their interest and needs.

Another important factor is adaptiveness when it comes to the learning path. Language learners are not alike; they have different levels at the start and will continue to learn differently throughout the program. Therefore, language learning products need to adapt to the progress of each individual learner, from reinforcing and strengthening weak points to accelerating through topics that are known already or mastered quickly.

Constant Feedback

Learners want to know where they are on their learning path at any moment, not at the end of the month or after they have completed a test or exam.

Language learning startups, like us, Adapt2me for instance, that implement a learning path into their products early on make it easy for learners to visualise their current level.

Faster Results

Based on personalised learning content, an adaptive learning path and constant feedback, language learners will expect faster results. Overall, our society is being constantly trained for instant gratification thanks to Google, Amazon and other web services that get us answers, solutions, or services right away.

At Adapt2me, we are working on language learning content that will lead users through their learning path the most efficient way.

Live and On-Demand

Yes, live lessons will also make a comeback in the language learning space. The difference today is that both technology and infrastructure can handle video and audio connections between tutors and students with ease. And with more and more tutors coming online and searching for ways to earn money teaching languages, the problem of scaling a 24/7 live lesson service will find resolution down the line, as well.

These impromptu sessions will most likely last 30 minutes. I doubt that learners will schedule an entire tutoring session spontaneously, as such a setting requires preparation from both sides. On-demand sessions work well for Q&A and quick help on a specific problem, which could be an interesting service or additional feature for test and exam prep.

If you want to be with the language learning trends, register for your free trial at adapt2me.com today.

No Comments | 08 June, 2016

Technology in Learning Part II

Last week we examined the platforms one should consider in learning.  This week we take a look at collaboration tools that will allow you to engage with colleagues, instructors, or tutors to help you improve your language skills.

Unlike individual learning, collaborative learning capitalizes on the skills, experience, and resources of each participant.  Each person becomes accountable to the group for the attainment of a particular goal.  

The advantages to using this method of learning can be summed up in the following:

  • Collaborative learning can unite students in the group committed to each other’s success.
  • In certain cultures, where it is impolite to question authority, collaborative learning can offer the advantage of open discussion and discovery from one’s peers resulting in improved end results.
  • There is more flexibility in learning techniques as agreed upon by group consensus.

Collaboration tools

Learning anything new can result in frustration and even failure unless you get to put the new learning into practice immediately.  This is where collaboration can be a boon.  By pooling your resources with other individuals you can speed up the process of learning and application.  

For that, there are a number of resources available.  I mentioned Skype and Google Hangout in Part I of this series.  Both tools are used by Adapt2me.  With these tools, it is not only possible to do one-on-one meetings, but also group meetings.

 

These applications address geographical challenges, time differentials, and even language barriers.  In the latter case, enunciation and pronunciation can be dealt with easily by writing the mispronounced word or name and using the dictionary link, thus facilitating and expediting the learning process to a second language.

LiveBinder can be used to track and share lessons. Being able to organise resources in a digital binder will help track progression and achievement of targeted goals.

Voicethread is used to collaborate and employs several tools – text, drawings, multi-media, videos – to convey or enhance your communication.  

Or create a Google site to track progress, store and share information with a closed community.  Thus a community of like minded individuals can not only learn from each other but help each other to improve.

Facebook is also a great way to connect to others with the same interests. If you are interested in learning about a particular topic, chances are there is a group already created in Facebook where you can view, discuss, learn, and share more information about that topic.

 

Adapt2me has their custom application to connect you to tutors who can help you acquire the skill of a second language.  There are mobile applications to connect, practice, track, test your progress, and discuss your achievements on Discussion Boards.  It is self-paced, allowing you to advance at your own speed.  

Whatever platform you choose to help you learn, the goal should always be about the end result.  Choosing the right tool to get you to your learning goal is equally as important and should not be taken lightly.

No Comments | 03 June, 2016