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(English) French/ ENGLISH COGNATES

Have you ever heard of a Cognate?  Chances are you already know them without realizing they had a name.  

These are words that share the same origin and have the same meaning across different languages.  The dictionary defines Cognates as: “allied or similar in nature or quality”.  When learning a new language and come across a cognate; this can help point to similarity, of meaning and help you better understand the word’s meaning.  

readme Sometimes there are slight variances between languages, but the variances can be minimal or so different that the similarity can be missed if you are not vigilant. — Hey! that’s an English/French cognate, “vigilant”.  Most languages that share the same root as in Latin or Greek will share the same words which can be spelt differently, but you’d have a hard time not connecting them.  Even languages that do not share the same roots can have cognates because of conquest, trade partnership or colonialism.

Cognate French/English glossary

Here are a few terms to increase your familiarity with French/English cognates.

English French
absolutely absolument
abundance abondance
accentuate accentuer
accident accident
acrobatic acrobatique
activity activités
actor acteur
address adresse
allergic allergique
appetite appétit
arrogance arrogance
artist artiste
banana banane
battery batterie
bicycle bicyclette
brutal brutal
cabin cabine
cafeteria cafétéria
capitain capitaine
ceremony cérémonie
coast côte
color couleur
common commun
curious curieux
magnificent magnifique
medal médaille
memory mémoire
naturally naturellement
ordinary ordinaire
October octobre
photograph photographie
restaurant restaurant
rock roche
salary salire
solid solide
stomach estomac
testimony témoignage
totally totalement
urgent urgence
venomous venimeux

 

In Conclusion

As you can see, there are quite a few, and the above is just a brief glossary of the many cognates that exist between French and English.  Some of you will notice barely a difference between them, like “October” that becomes “octobre” in French, while others will need a discerning eye to see the similarities, like “January” that becomes “janvier”.  

out site Notice in both example that English capitalizes the first letter for a proper noun and French doesn’t. There are, of course, words that are exactly the same in both languages but do not remotely mean the same things – like “bras” in English that is a diminutive of “brassier” but “bras” in French means “arm”.

It can be fun to pick up literature in a Latin/Greek based language and try to pick out the cognates and try to decipher the meaning of the sentence.

Next time you are speaking to your tutor on the Adapt2me platform, challenge him/her to a cognate contest?

So let’s have some fun!  Below is a list of English and French cognates.  Why don’t you fill in the missing cognate in either language?  Type your answers in the comments section below.

 

décembre
diamant
dictionary
docteur
enormous
exactly
féroce
garden
history histoire
immigrant immigrant
island
lemon
lentille
January janvier

Challenge us by posting your own examples of cognates that will stump us.

No Comments | 29 June, 2016

(English) Important Differences Between French & English

There are some differences between French and English that can be challenging to learn.

out site  The most obvious are English phonetic sounds that use different muscles than those used to speak French.  This is the case, even though those two languages share several grammatical features and cognates.

Phonology

There are sounds used by Anglophones that can cause a Francophone some anxiety and enunciation problems that can lead to a lack of understanding and spelling errors.  A typical pronunciation problem is the inability to correctly articulate the vowel sounds in minimal pairs such as; to/two//too, live/leave, prey/pray, ship/sheep, full/fool, there/their/they’re – these words are called ‘Homophones’.  Too often homophones and homonyms are confused depending on whom you ask.  

Then, there are the homographs, which are words that have the same spelling but mean totally different things and can have different pronunciation.  Lead the metal and lead the action of being in front is an example; bass the low sound and bass the fish is another.

Alphabet

Although both languages have 26 letters in their alphabet, the French language has some letters with diacritics (these are words with accents).  These accents are meant to point to the different enunciation of that vowel.  Another common mistake, which I often make, is to confuse J for G, and E for I when someone is spelling out a word.

Another typical problem for a Francophone, which is often used to imitate and mock a Francophone, is the inability to pronounce the H sound in some words – that’s because French speakers do not use their tongue in the same manner as English speakers so that ‘heard’ becomes ‘eard’ and ‘Harry’ becomes ‘arry’ and ‘the’ becomes ‘de’.

Grammar – Verb/Tense

French and English verb grammar have several areas of overlap. For example, both languages have auxiliaries, participles, active/passive voice, past/present/future tenses. However, there are some differences that can cause interference in the production of English.

A typical problem is the wrong choice of tense. Despite the external similarities of verb grammar, there are frequent occasions when French uses a different tense than English to convey a particular meaning.

Some common examples are the following faulty sentences:

  • I have played hockey yesterday.  [I played hockey yesterday]
  • I can’t play now. I do my homework.  [I can’t play now. I am doing my homework.]
  • I live in Montréal since last year.  [I have lived in Montreal since last year.]
  • I will tell you as soon as I will know.  [I will tell you as soon as I know.]

buy it Because French does not use the auxiliary ‘do’, learners may have problems in asking questions. For example, they may simply make a statement and use question intonation: He is handsome? Or they may invert subject and verb: How often see you her?

Grammar – Other

Although English and French share the same basic Subject-Verb-Object syntax, there are numerous variations in the word order of sentences that are more complicated than the simple ‘I bought a new car’ type.

Here are a few common errors:

  • I play sometimes games.  [I sometimes play games.]
  • I have too much eat!  [I had too much to eat!]
  • Do you know what is the time?  [Do you know what time it is?]

The biggest difference is related to gender assignment to nouns that always stumps non-Francophones.  Whether a chair is feminine (la chaise) or masculine, and if feminine, then why is a couch masculine (le sofa)?  Or if a street is feminine (la rue), then why is the highway masculine (l’autoroute)?

Vocabulary

A large number of words in the two languages have the same Latin root and are mutually comprehensible – although this applies more to academic/technical words than to everyday vocabulary. The concomitant problem, however, is the significant number of false connections. Here are just a few examples. The French word is listed first, followed by the correct English equivalent: cave / cellar; sensible / sensitive; ignorer / not know.

Two excellent web sources for phonological information are:

  • Non-native pronunciations of English on Answers.com.
  • The Speech Accent Archive

Talk to your Adapt2me tutor about homophones and make it a game to come up with a list of your own.

No Comments | 29 June, 2016

(English) Because we care … 15 minutes free tutoring with a language expert

When we decided to create adapt2me achat cialis quebec.com we had two main concerns in mind: the first was to create a platform that adapts to the personal needs of each student, and second to support our students individually and addressing their concerns to make sure that they are on the right track.

Unlike other platforms or software that might feel too robotic, our state of the art technology combined with live tutoring sessions creates a unique learning experience.

Creates a support system

Our tutoring sessions allow students with their tutors to practice either English or French. Students can clarify foggy concepts with their tutors and receive real-life examples and applications of the concepts.  

Motivation

Many behavioral studies have shown that there is increased motivation when studying in a group or with a tutor. The ability to discuss what was learned to another person seems to offer a stimulating reward that encourages most students seriously pursuing any studies.

Pronunciation

The tutoring sessions are a great tool to correct common pronunciations problems that most foreign students encounter. The tutor will give the student important tools to avoid the traps of common mistakes.

Prepare for a test or a job

Our tutors will give recommendations for students who are preparing for specific language examinations. The tutors can also assist you by practicing job interviews questions in case you will be interviewed in either French or English

Additional tutoring sessions

If you enjoyed our free tutoring session that comes with our basic plan, you can purchase additional tutoring time by emailing us to:

[email protected]

No Comments | 17 March, 2016

Les 10 expressions les plus utilisées en anglais.

Il est important d’apprendre les expressions d’une langue.

Voici 10 expressions idiomatiques en anglais suivi de leur équivalent français :

 

1. If you scratch my back i’ll scratch yours.

Traduction littérale : Si vous grattez mon dos je vais gratter le votre.

Équivalent français : Un service en vaut un autre.

Exemple : Can you help me with my homework, if you scratch my back i’ll scratch yours

 

2. Bite off more than you can chew.

Traduction littérale : Mordre plus que l’on peut macher.

Équivalent français : Les yeux plus gros que le ventre.

Exemple : Don’t take to many classes this semester, don’t bite off more than you can chew !

 

3. You can’t judge a book by its cover.

Traduction littérale : Vous ne pouvez pas juger un livre a sa couverture.

Équivalent français : Il ne faut pas se fier aux apparences.

Exemple : You should treat every customer like royalty, you can’t judge a book by its cover.

 

4. When pigs fly.

Traduction littérale : Quand les cochons pourront voler.

Équivalent français : Quand les poules auront des dents.

Exemple : Allen : Aliens will contact earth in a few days.

Luke : Ahahaha sure when pigs fly !

 

5. Piece of cake.

Traduction littérale : Morceaux de gâteau

Équivalent français : C’est du gâteau. 

Exemple : That exam was a piece of cake !

 

6. Break a leg.

Traduction littérale : Casse une jambe

Équivalent français : Merde.

Exemple : Son : I’m going to my final exam now.

Dad : Break a leg !

 

7. Let the cat out of the bag.

Traduction littérale : Laisse le chat sortir du sac.

Équivalent français : Crache le morceau.

Exemple : I know you are hiding something, let the cat out of the bag !

 

8. Beat around the bush.

Traduction littérale : Tourner autour du buisson.

Équivalent français : Tourner autour du pot.

Exemple : Who gave you access to this room ? stop beating around the bush !

 

9. Call it a day.

Traduction littérale : Appeler le jour.

Équivalent français : Suffire pour aujourd’hui.

Exemple : You did more than I expected , call it a day !

 

10. Once in a blue moon.

Traduction littérale : One fois dans une lune bleue.

Équivalent français : Tous les trente-six du mois.

Exemple : I eat am vegetarian most of the time but once in a blue moon I like to eat sea food.

 

 

Apprenez où vous le souhaitez avec notre application mobile !

No Comments | 22 February, 2016