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Language Learning Trends

Here are two predictions:

1. The number of languages spoken by Canadians will increase as immigration trends continue to rise.2. English and French will continue to dominate as the primary languages in Canada, but in certain sections of the country, Asian and Arabic languages will become prominent as population density from immigration rises.

Language Learning Trends in 2016 and beyond

out site English will become one of the top five non-native languages being learned by new Canadians in 2020.  Chinese/Mandarin will join Arabic, Urdu, Farsi, and Spanish  as one of the five most popular non-native languages for Canadians to learn and there will be a double-digit increase in K-12 classrooms using language learning technology.   A confirmation for this trend comes from Rosetta Stone rival Duolingo.

Rosetta Stone also predicts that this year people will use more mobile devices than desktops or laptops to learn a language, which is a trend we can already see in Asia and among learners who use competing services like Adapt2me.

Which Languages will be left in 2115

What will the global language space look like 100 years from now?

Dr. McWhorter, who teaches linguistics, American Studies, philosophy and music at Columbia University, wrote a commendable essay last week.

readme He predicts that in 2115 the landscape will have radically changed but that English will remain lingua franca. From the 6000 languages that are currently spoken only, 600 will survive. A lot of those remaining languages will be dialects of more widely spoken languages like English.

The remaining languages will also be simplified with less complicated grammar and less vocabulary.  The latter will be driven by third wave of language “streamlining” that takes place among immigrant communities in cities around the globe.

Today language learning technology is once again on the upswing, powered by mobile devices as well as better broadband and mobile coverage. This leads to the following five key trends in language learning we see for the coming years.

Mobile

Mobile is the rocket fuel for the new wave of language learning products. Smartphones and mobile Internet made it possible to add bite-sized lessons and learning sprints to the daily routine of commuters. From serious approaches based on curated web content, mobile is THE learning environment to conquer in the language space.

Personalised and Adaptive

One-size-fits-all educational content for language learning will become a thing of the past. Learners today want content tailored to their interest and needs.

Another important factor is adaptiveness when it comes to the learning path. Language learners are not alike; they have different levels at the start and will continue to learn differently throughout the program. Therefore, language learning products need to adapt to the progress of each individual learner, from reinforcing and strengthening weak points to accelerating through topics that are known already or mastered quickly.

Constant Feedback

Learners want to know where they are on their learning path at any moment, not at the end of the month or after they have completed a test or exam.

Language learning startups, like us, Adapt2me for instance, that implement a learning path into their products early on make it easy for learners to visualise their current level.

Faster Results

Based on personalised learning content, an adaptive learning path and constant feedback, language learners will expect faster results. Overall, our society is being constantly trained for instant gratification thanks to Google, Amazon and other web services that get us answers, solutions, or services right away.

At Adapt2me, we are working on language learning content that will lead users through their learning path the most efficient way.

Live and On-Demand

Yes, live lessons will also make a comeback in the language learning space. The difference today is that both technology and infrastructure can handle video and audio connections between tutors and students with ease. And with more and more tutors coming online and searching for ways to earn money teaching languages, the problem of scaling a 24/7 live lesson service will find resolution down the line, as well.

These impromptu sessions will most likely last 30 minutes. I doubt that learners will schedule an entire tutoring session spontaneously, as such a setting requires preparation from both sides. On-demand sessions work well for Q&A and quick help on a specific problem, which could be an interesting service or additional feature for test and exam prep.

If you want to be with the language learning trends, register for your free trial at adapt2me.com today.

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